Gallery

      

Each original sheep study is hand drawn on A2 sized white satin art board using Derwent Studio Coloured Pencils on a digitalised coloured background.
Each picture takes about a week to produce after carefully selecting images of the artist’s own sheep that best illustrate their distinctive character.
Each original sheep study is hand drawn on A2 sized white satin art board using Derwent Studio Coloured Pencils on a digitalised coloured background.
Each picture takes about a week to produce after carefully selecting images of the artist’s own sheep that best illustrate their distinctive character.

Giclee Prints

Each original is available as limited edition giclée prints, either as a stretched canvas or on fine art paper in both A2 and A3 sizes. The prints are produced in a limited edition run of just 50 and are all numbered and signed by the artist.
The Giclee method of fine art printing offers one of the highest degrees of accuracy and richness of colour by utilising the latest digital processes and printing with archival pigment inks for long life (UV stable with a lifespan of 100+ years).

Canvas Prints

The canvas prints are printed onto 100% cotton canvas which has been specially treated to take the giclée process. Printed using lightfast, archival inks and then oversealed with a protective, matt varnish containing UV blockers that filter out 95% of harmful light and help protect the surface. The canvases are then stretched over a unique system of tensioned, box stretchers made from chamfered, obeche wood, obtained from renewable sources. This system ensures that the frames will not warp or twist and that any slackening over time can be re-tensioned simply by pushing the tensioning blocks further into each corner.

“The commercially bred sheep is a commodity, but any shepherd will tell you that certain individuals stand out either physically, in character or even for being markedly less intelligent than other members of the flock.

Keeping a small number of rare breed sheep you learn that each individual does have its own character and even nobility under all that wool, this is what I have tried to capture.”

Only the artist’s most memorable sheep have been captured in this series of 8 drawings. It is hoped that more studies will arrive soon of other of Hilary’s animal characters and quite possibly a series of landscape studies of her beautiful surroundings, depicting the windswept moors and valleys of the South Pennines. Watch this space . . .